Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness

To find volunteers that are willing to help you with family history research in the USA, go to http://www.raogk.com/.  They will search courthouse records, take cemetery photos, etc.  The service is free but you must pay for any expenses incurred while fulfilling your request (copies, parking fees, postage, etc.)

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Disclosure of Material Connection:  I have not received any compensation for writing this post from http://www.raogk.com.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Challenge #30 – 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy

Here’s your weekly challenge:  Emergency Chain

View the entire description of this week’s challenge, by using my Examiner.com, Phoenix Genealogy Examiner link.  Click here.

Remember to choose only the challenges that suit you and fit into your schedule.
These challenges are meant to be a blessing, not a burden!

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog has put together the helpful 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy series. These prompts are hosted on the Geneabloggers website. You may be interested in seeing posts about the challenge from other Geneabloggers.  Both sites have been voted among Family Tree Magazine’s Top 40 Genealogy Websites this year.

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Note from Family Tree Gal, Carolyn:  Have you joined the Family Tree Quest at www.familytreequest.com ?  I also invite you to join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Check out my Family Tree Gal Blog if you haven’t done so already.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation from Amy Coffin or Geneabloggers.com for writing this post. I am listed on the Geneabloggers Blog Roll because I find it to be a valuable, shared community resource. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Conference on Family History and Genealogy

There is a family history conference at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah July 27-30.  Here is the description from the website:

Theme: Strengthening Ties That Bind Families Together Forever

The 42nd annual BYU Conference on Family History and Genealogy will offer more than 100 classes, allowing participants to gain new skills and helpful information. Class topics include Beginning Family History, FamilySearch, Writing the Narrative Family History, Using Computers, Internet and Technology, Basic Research Methodologies, Using the BYU Harold B. Lee Library, Research in the United States and Canada, Colonial America, International Research, Methodology, British Research, and Tips for Professional Genealogists.

Keep in mind that limited on-campus housing is available. For more information call (801) 422–4853. The conference will be in the BYU Conference Center (770 East University Parkway, Provo, Utah).

Click here to link to the website.

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Disclosure of Material Connection:  I have not received any compensation for writing this post from Brigham Young University.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Free Interactive Slave Records Collection

Footnote.com is making available black history records and documents for free with registration.  They have partnered with Lowcountry Africana to make this possible.

 Here is the announcement:

SALT LAKE CITY – July19, 2010 

Today Footnote.com (www.footnote.com) and LowcountryAfricana (www.lowcountryafricana.net) announced the launch of a new free collection of historical records from the South Carolina Department of Archives and History containing estate inventories and bills of sale for Colonial and Charleston, South Carolina from 1732 to 1872. FamilySearch International donated the copies of the microfilm of the original historical documents.

Charlestons role as a port of entry during the Atlantic Slave Trade means many thousands of African Americans may have ancestors who came from, or through, South Carolina. This new collection on Footnote.com will assist African American genealogy research by forming, in many cases, a seamless paper trail from Emancipation to the 1700s.

“Research about African American history and genealogy has often been especially difficult because of limited access to primary source material,” says Henry Louis Gates Jr., Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research.

Footnote.com is spearheading a revolution in access to the black past by digitizing major portions of the black archive, and making these records available on the Internet. The publication of these records from South Carolina in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is the latest example of their bold commitment to resurrecting the African American past.”

Footnote.com provides an experience where visitors can access historical records and interact with those records and members of the Footnote community.

Visitors to Footnote.com can enhance these records from the South Carolina archives through various activities including:

Creating and sharing webpages about the documents and their discoveries

Adding their own insights and comments to the documents

Uploading and connecting their own photos, letters and documents

Annotating information on the documents, which creates a searchable database

“We are excited that Footnote has joined this collaboration because they offer family historians the ability to turn public records into personal history, said Toni Carrier, Founding Director of Lowcountry Africana. “Nowhere else on the Internet can readers interact with historical records in such a meaningful way.”

“South Carolina has one of the richest sets of early government records of social and cultural history,” said Charles Lesser, Senior Archivist at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. “This new cooperative effort will revolutionize access to an especially important segment of those records.”

To view these South Carolina records, please visit Footnote.com.

About Footnote, Inc.

Footnote.com is a subscription website that features original historical documents, providing visitors with an unaltered view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com, all are invited to come share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit http://www.footnote.com.

About Lowcountry Africana

Lowcountry Africana, sponsored by the Magnolia Plantation Foundation of Charleston, South Carolina, is a free website dedicated to African American genealogy and history in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida,home to the rich Gullah-Geechee cultural heritage. The entire content of Lowcountry Africana is, and always will be, 100% free.

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Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post from Lowcountry Africana.  I am happy to be an affiliate of footnote.com. Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.”  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Challenge #29 – 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy

Here’s your weekly challenge:  Practice reading handwriting.

View the entire description of this week’s challenge, by using my Examiner.com, Phoenix Genealogy Examiner link.  Click here.

Remember to choose only the challenges that suit you and fit into your schedule.
These challenges are meant to be a blessing, not a burden!

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog has put together the helpful 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy series. These prompts are hosted on the GeneaBloggers website. You may be interested in seeing posts about the challenge from other GeneaBloggers.  Both sites have been voted among Family Tree Magazine’s Top 40 Genealogy Websites this year.

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Note from Family Tree Gal, Carolyn:  Have you joined the Family Tree Quest at www.familytreequest.com ?  I also invite you to join me on Facebook and Twitter. Check out my Family Tree Gal Blog if you haven’t done so already.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I am listed on the Genea Bloggers Blog Roll because I find it to be a valuable, shared community resource. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Do You Have Ancestors From Shetland?

Here is the latest from the Shetland News:

“RESEARCHERS can now access the entire catalogue at Shetland archives from anywhere in the world with the click of a mouse.

Archives staff have spent the past five years meticulously transferring details of the huge collection of material onto the internet, amounting to 75,000 records containing even over 100,000 documents.

The archives, based at the museum at Lerwick’s Hay’s Dock, contain a vast reserve of information about life in Shetland dating back as far as the 15th century.

The are council papers, court records, books, oral history recordings and the contents of journals such as the New Shetlander, Shetland Life and Shetland Fishing News.

While the documents themselves are not available on line, people can search the archive for relevant documents and contact archives staff to either go in and see the original or be sent a photocopy. . .

The catalogue can be accessed through the Shetland Museum and Archives website at www.shetland-museum.org.uk or directly at http://www.calmview.eu/ShetlandArchive/CalmView/

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Disclosure of Material Connection:  I have not received any compensation for writing this post from The Shetland News or website.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

JewishGen and MyHeritage.com Collaborate

Here is the press release from the JewishGen Blog:

Press Release: JewishGen and MyHeritage.com collaborate to build the Family Tree of the Jewish People

Tel Aviv, Israel; London, UK and Los Angeles, US – July 10, 2010 – MyHeritage.com and JewishGen.org are now working together to invigorate the Family Tree of the Jewish People (FTJP) project.

Under this collaboration, family trees built with a special version of MyHeritage.com available at http://www.myheritage.com/jewishgen, with the consent of the tree creators, will be transferred periodically to the FTJP for digital safekeeping. Privacy controls, using the MyHeritage.com tools, can be set according to the wishes of the tree creator. Data of existing MyHeritage.com users will not be transferred.

JewishGen is a non-profit organization created to help researchers interested in Jewish genealogy around the world connect to each other, research their families and ancestral geographic locations, participate in research projects and store Jewish family trees safely. The mission of JewishGen is to obtain records and information that will be valuable to those with Jewish ancestry and place them on the JewishGen website, at no cost, in an easy to understand and searchable format.

The Family Tree of the Jewish People is a project of JewishGen to bring together family historians around the world who research Jewish family branches. The project offers a central resource for Jewish family trees and helps re-connect Jewish families.

MyHeritage.com is a genealogical social networking site with more than 50 million members and 590 million profiles worldwide. It currently holds some 15 million family trees. It operates in 36 languages including English and Hebrew, making it ideal for Jewish families around the world to connect, as it offers easy and fun tools to enable sharing of information, photos, documents and videos among far-flung relatives, with complete and secure privacy controls that can be set by tree creators.

“JewishGen is committed to ensuring Jewish continuity for present generations and generations yet to come,” says JewishGen managing director Warren Blatt. “Our free, easy-to-use website features thousands of databases, research tools and other resources to help those with Jewish ancestry research and find family members. The vision of JewishGen is to connect Jews throughout the world with their relatives and provide them with the ability to learn about their family history and heritage.”

“MyHeritage.com – a site used all over the world and by all religions – is among the most popular genealogy websites in the Jewish world, making it a natural partner for JewishGen”, said Blatt. “The benefit of this partnership is to offer the free website tools from MyHeritage.com to create and research family trees, with the option to share those trees with the thousands of JewishGen users via the FTJP. Under the new partnership, the FTJP will be invigorated and constantly updated, resulting in an accurate, up-to-date and constantly growing Jewish family tree database for JewishGen.”

“We are excited to join forces with JewishGen,” said Gilad Japhet, founder and CEO of MyHeritage.com, himself an avid genealogist and a member of JewishGen since August 2000. “We see it as a privilege to cooperate with JewishGen and help it preserve family trees of people who wish to discover, and be discovered by, fellow researchers and relatives,” Japhet added. “Our Smart Matching technology will provide genealogists the added benefit of discovering additional relatives through the large databases on MyHeritage.com. This will fulfill the mutual objective of MyHeritage.com and JewishGen to reunite families whose ties have been lost through time and fate.”

About MyHeritage.com:
MyHeritage.com was founded by a team of people who combine their passion for family history with the development of innovative technology. Since launching in November 2005 MyHeritage.com has become the world’s leading international online network for families and the second largest family history website. The fastest growth rates in the industry combined with the acquisitions of Pearl Street Software (2007), Kindo.com (2008) and OSN (2009) have made MyHeritage.com the home for 50 million family members and 590 million profiles. The company has offices in London, UK; Hamburg, Germany; Boulder, Colorado, USA and Tel Aviv, Israel. MyHeritage.com has received funding by Accel Partners and Index Ventures. For more information, visit http://www.myheritage.com/jewishgen.

About JewishGen:
JewishGen, a non-profit organization affiliated with the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, was founded in 1987 as a bulletin board with only 150 users who were interested in Jewish genealogy. Primarily driven by volunteers, there are over 700 active volunteers throughout the world who actively contribute to its ever growing collection of databases, resources and search tools. Currently, JewishGen hosts more than 14 million records, and provides a myriad of resources and search tools designed to assist those researching their Jewish ancestry. JewishGen provides its resources online as a public service.

For more information please contact:

For MyHeritage.com: Daniel Horowitz – Daniel@MyHeritage.com
For JewishGen: Warren Blatt – wblatt@JewishGen.org

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Disclosure of Material Connection:  I have not received any compensation for writing this post from JewishGen or MyHeritage.com.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Jewish Family History Research

Family Search made the following announcement this month:

“A valuable resource for Jewish genealogical research has expanded to include records from all over the world. The popular Knowles Collection from FamilySearch is a free database connecting Jewish records of 115,000 people in 30 countries. The combining of those records into one collection makes it easier for researchers to find family sources.”

“Knowles started the database in 2007 to help him find his own Jewish ancestry. The collection began with 6,500 records from the British Isles, but has now rapidly expanded into five geographically-based databases with more than 115,000 names:

The Jews of the British Isles — 82,000 names

The Jews of the Americas — 10,300 names

The Jews of Europe — 18,697 names

The Jews of the Caribbean — 2,200 names

The Jews of Africa and the Orient — 367 names

The Knowles Collection is compiled from more than 200 different sources that have been transcribed and combined by volunteers. There is also a complete list of where the original records can be found. The entire collection is now linked electronically as families and fully searchable on FamilySearch’s Community Trees project, found at histfam.familysearch.org. Researchers can also download GEDCOM versions of each collection from www.familysearch.org .”

For the full news release click here.

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Disclosure of Material Connection:  I have not received any compensation for writing this post from familysearch.org.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Challenge #28 – 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy

Here’s your weekly challenge:  Trademarks and Patents

View the entire description of this week’s challenge, by using my Examiner.com, Phoenix Genealogy Examiner link.  Click here.

Remember to choose only the challenges that suit you and fit into your schedule.
These challenges are meant to be a blessing, not a burden!

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog has put together the helpful 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy series. These prompts are hosted on the GeneaBloggers website. You may be interested in seeing posts about the challenge from other GeneaBloggers.  Both sites have been voted among Family Tree Magazine’s Top 40 Genealogy Websites this year.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Note from Family Tree Gal, Carolyn:  Have you joined the Family Tree Quest at www.familytreequest.com ?  I also invite you to join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Check out my Family Tree Gal Blog if you haven’t done so already.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I am listed on the Genea Bloggers Blog Roll because I find it to be a valuable, shared community resource. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Ellis Island

Stephen P. Morse has a website that contains lots of valuable information for people researching U.S. immigrants to Ellis Island and other ports.  It contains helps on how to find your ancestor when names were so frequently changed upon arrival to the U.S.  It has other valuable information as well.  It is a great resource for genealogists.  Go take a look!

 

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Disclosure of Material Connection:  I have not received any compensation for writing this post from Stephen P. Morse.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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